High Traffic, High Risk in the Strait of Malacca

The chokepoint, near where Sunday’s collision between the USS John S. McCain and an oil tanker occurred, is one of the world’s busiest shipping routes.
KRISHNADEV CALAMUR
The Strait of Malacca, near where 10 U.S. sailors are missing after their vessel, the USS John S. McCain, collided Sunday with an oil tanker, has historically been one of the world’s busiest shipping routes and chokepoints—and growing traffic in the waterway has resulted in recent warnings of the increased risk of accidents.
The strait connects the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Many of the world’s largest economies, which are now concentrated in the Asia-Pacific region, use the channel for trade with the energy-rich Middle East and resource-rich Africa. The strait is one of the world’s busiest: Nearly 100,000 vessels pass through it each year, accounting for about one-quarter of the world’s traded goods.
To continue reading, please click here.
Source: https://www.theatlantic.com/

Share this article

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

More articles from MAST...

Get in touch

Main Office: +44 (0) 1279 216726

Risk Consulting
Email: Riskconsulting@mast-security.co.uk
Call: +44 (0) 1279 874 528

Physical and Asset Security
Email: Protection@mast-security.com
Call: +44 (0) 1279 874 529

Security Systems
Email: Technology@mast-security.com
Call: +44 (0) 1279 874 521

Maritime Security
Email: Operations@mast-security.co.uk
Duty Manager: +44 (0) 7827 359132
24/7 Emergency Telephone+44 (0) 1202 045 833

Skip to content